Showing 14 results for "Musculoskeletal"


Necrotizing Fasciitis

Does finding fascial fluid help?

By Michael Prats on 08/19/19 06:00 AM

Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a real bad deal. We usually rely on clinical exam (which can be misleading) or other imaging studies (which can take forever) to make the diagnosis. POCUS would be an awesome solution in helping to make this time-sensitive determination. We know it can pick up fascial fluid, air, subcutaneous changes...but really how good is it when it comes down to diagnosing this deadly disease? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31031033


POCUS in the Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures

Picking up the pieces?

By Michael Prats, MD on 04/15/19 06:00 AM

Fractures of the distal radius are pretty common among people who choose not to break their fall with their face. Sure - it's not hard to see these on xray, but is there a better way? Ultrasound is great for finding fractures, but what about being able to guide the reduction? This has been shown to be useful in a pediatric population, but this study looks at a population of adult patients in the emergency department to see just how accurate ultrasound is for determining if the pieces have been put back together. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30191190


FAST for Hemorrhage from Pelvic Fracture

Should we talk about REBOA?

By Michael Prats, MD on 12/10/18 06:00 AM

The FAST exam is tried and true for trauma, but in the past it hasn't been super useful for patients with isolated pelvic fractures. This study teases out a very sick subset of this population - patient who have significant hemorrhage associated with their fracture. The question is how well can the FAST identify intraabdominal hemorrhage in these people. The authors' idea is that if the FAST can find intraperitoneal blood, it might help determine who would benefit from REBOA instead of laparotomy.


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