Showing 9 results for "trauma"


Ultrasound for Abdominal Stab Wounds

is this just crazy?

By Michael Prats, MD on 06/05/17 02:00 AM

The idea here is that some people that suffer the misfortune and inconvenience of being stabbed in the abdomen will require a surgical laparotomy. On the other hand, some will not. We don't want to miss the ones that do, but we don't want the latter to get unnecessary operations. If the wound does not penetrate so deep as to violate the peritoneum then there is low risk of intraabdominal organ injury. Instead of probing and exploring the wound which can be painful, perhaps ultrasound can offer a less invasive way of determining whether or not the peritoneum was violated.


The Most Sensitive View of the FAST

Winner: Caudal Edge of Liver

By Michael Prats, MD on 03/27/17 02:00 AM

The FAST exam (focused assessment with sonography in trauma) looks for two things - intraperitoneal free fluid in the abdomen and fluid around the heart. With regard to the abdomen, there are a lot of places the fluid can go. It would be helpful to know in which areas the fluid most commonly collects so you can make sure not to miss any. These authors break down each of the three abdominal FAST views (right upper quadrant, left upper quadrant, and suprapubic/pelvic) into three "sub-quadrants." Then they take a look at all the FAST exams done at their institution over a year and a half and determine how often the fluid goes to each of those places when there is a positive exam.


Contrast Ultrasound in Trauma

FAST of the future?

By Michael Prats, MD on 02/13/17 01:00 AM

The FAST (focused assessment with sonography for trauma) is great for picking up free fluid in cases of intraabdominal hemorrhage; however, it is not so good at diagnosing solid organ injury. What about if we add contrast? This articles takes a look at the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in blunt abdominal trauma patients. Is this the next cool thing in trauma diagnostics?


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