Showing 9 results for "trauma"


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Ultrasound for Nailbed Injury

What?!

By Michael Prats, MD on 01/16/17 01:00 AM

Nail bed injuries are common from finger trauma, but we can't be just ripping off everybody's finger nail to see what what was injured. Maybe ultrasound can help? Hey maybe we also can find fractures of the finger tip while we're at it. This paper takes a look to see how accurate ultrasound is in the diagnosis of these injuries! Honestly, most people are probably not removing finger nails just to repair a small laceration these days so you will have to decide for yourself how this might be useful to you.


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Comparison of Four views versus Single View for Pneumothorax

Clinically significant pneumothorax that is

By Michael Prats, MD on 11/07/16 03:00 AM

Ultrasound is great at diagnosing pneumothorax. This is especially important in the trauma patient, where it has become integrated into the extended FAST exam. I think we are all wondering if we can (safely) get away with a quick look in a single space bilaterally to rule out a significant pneumothorax. This study prospectively evaluates this question to determine how well 1 view compares to 4 views in finding a pneumothorax in the trauma patient.


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Importance of the Left Upper Quadrant View in the FAST exam

How often is the LUQ view useful?

By Michael Prats, MD on 09/12/16 02:00 AM

The left upper quadrant view in the FAST (focused assessment with sonography for trauma) exam can be difficult to get just right. This paper examines how important it is in finding intraabdominal free fluid. The authors reviewed FAST exams to determine how often there is free fluid only in the left upper quadrant. Also, they looked to see which part of the left upper quadrant free fluid went to most often. Spoiler alert: its not the subphrenic space!


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